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will have to move that garbage bin to the front street. we will use rubber wheels on that. >> thank you. the conditions of approval seem to me to differ from other conditions of approval, particularly where there is patio seating involved. they do not reference hours of operation. >> that is correct. the department would be willing to add suitable hours of operation controls. it could be from 10:00 until 10:00 or whenever the commission feels is necessary. >> this is the situation of a very major neighborhood commercial district. i appreciate the concerns of the neighbors on bartlett street. they reside and bought projects and housing that backs into a major commercial district. one has to assume that there will be permitted commercial uses. that would include the entire lot. that is standard. commercial uses are not limited to a portion of the lot. i am not going to gointo healthy food, fast food, and all of that. i wonder if we would consider this differently if it was a k fc. the websites says 340 restaurants worldwide. you might start to make that comparison. as far as the hiring co
. >> it is the trend we need to watch. >> they're killing us. i'm out of work. i don't know how i'm going to afford to live. >> we waste, waste, waste. while other parts of the world already see the light. now to mention that the vast majority of the power we generate isn't powering anything. >> they don't let two thirds of it fly out the window or into the sky or wherever it goes. can you think of a more important issue when it comes to our infrastructure, the way we live, or for that matter, our own national security. >>> in the middle east a powderkeg with the spark of revolution lit. >> that brings people out in the streets and really brings temperatures to the boiling point. >> the saudis are not going to tolerate much. >> they're using weapons we gave them against some of these democracy groups. >>> today, tackling perhaps the most solvable of our nation's trillion dollar problems. there is a way, but until now, there hasn't been a will. >> utilities got to 34% efficiency when eisenhower was in the white house. they're still at the same level today. >> get ready for steel on wheels in america
are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nuclear complex with so much problems in the past couple of days, today, another reactor facing the possibility of a meltdown. they say they are in control of the situation. but the evacuation from the region around the reactors continues and the possibility of poisoning from radioactivity also going forward. dozens are testing positive for that. now to the number. there is one official here, in one region who said yesterday that 10,000 people were missing. now he is saying he feels that 10,000 people are dead in his region alone. that may add to the figure. we traveled today and we notice shortages are a problem. of food, of fuel and power in this village, of everything people need to get by. that is why relief is rushing to this area. tod
are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a fourth night of allied air strikes pounding libya, leader
is on the way from the u.s. and other countries. with so many roads damaged, the challenge will be getting all of that aid to the people who need it. more than 200 aftershocks have jolted japan since the quake hit, and some of them quite powerful. several happened near a nuclear plant where one reactor has been overheating since friday's earthquake. >> officials say an explosion there involved an outer building, not any of the reactors. people living within 12 miles of the plant have been told to evacuate. before nightfall, more than 3,000 people were rescued across the country. the death toll has topped 900. and officials now fear it could grow higher. we're getting new video in from japan and it really is something to watch. take a look. >> ireporter aaron sent this to us. he was attending a college graduation at a theater in tokyo when the earthquake hit. the theater roof collapsed, but aaron and many others were able to get out, and we hope to talk to aaron lace live as soon as we're able to get a connection with him. so stay with us for his story to match some of those remarkable images.
. jechlt dionne, a pleasure to have you with us tonight. >> great to be with you. >> tonight in the survey i asked if the wisconsin 14 have done enough to come home, and >>> the huckster strikes again, let's play "hardball." good evening, i'm chris matthews up in philadelphia tonight. leading off tonight playing the madrasa card. the smiling face of the republican right has doubled down now. while adding that while most boys grew up around boy scouts, and going to rotary meeting, mr. obama grew up around madrasa. this is just a way of saying obama is really a terrorist. not from america, of course. is this what it takes to be a leader in the republican party? appeal to the haters who cannot accept the legitimacy of this president? on a parallel note, one of our pollsters tells us yesterday, it may be hard to understand why someone would jump off a cliff unless you understand they're being chased by a tiger. and that tiger is the tea party. in other words the gop is jumping off the political cliff right now and the tea party is that tiger chasing behind it. the latest example, a tea party l
arriving in tokyo within the past 24 or so is martin savidge. he's joining us now by phone. last time john spoke with you, you were trying to make your way from tokyo on a flight to get somewhere north of there. how are you doing? where are you? >> well, you know what, we're still trying to do the same thing, fred. we've just gotten into vans and we're going to make our way to the domestic airport. and it is hoped from there that we catch a plight in about maybe two hours. this will be a domestic flight that might take us db leapfrog us 150, 200 miles north. as you know the roads and of course the rail system is out up in that region. so what we're trying to do is fly as far as we can north and we still know we're eventually going to have to go on road and probably take hours after that point. so that's the point. right now, though, as you said, it is very early in the morning here in japan and it is going to be a critical day of the rescue effort really being ramped up. it ramped up yesterday and it will be more so today as they continue to flpluck them from t rooftops. two natural disast
. they'll include stan grant in tokyo for us, kyung lau is in sendai, anna coren is there as well. elise labatt watching things for us in washington, d.c. and josh levs. we're keeping a close eye on sendai, japan, a city of about a million people now in tatters. cnn international correspondent anna coren has had a tough time getting there, actually. but she's there now live with an update on the ground. anna, what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, already it's pretty quiet here in sendai at the moment. the city is quite deserted. i think many people are just trying to get out. a lot of sendai has been blacked out as far as power and water goes. there are pockets which are up and running from where we are. the majority of the city, it is out. so people are wanting to get out. they're leaving the city. they have been a number of of shocks as well. a tsunami warning is still in place over much of the east coast of japan. so people wanting to get out, wanting to get away from the coastline that has brought so much pain and suffering the last couple of days. >> and what are supplies like th
pitch black. there are a lot of streets with all sorts of debris. us a move closer to the north you can see where the water may have been two or three inches and became four or five or six feet. one car was literally spiked into a fence as if it was skewered. we haven't been up in this region in the daylight. >> kelly: based on what you've seen and what you just described as getting cold and weather getting very cold right now, one thing comes to mind. fear and panic. how will the people avoid that. are they getting help to avoid that? >> reporter: they are but it's tough to get around to the people. you don't know about the fear and panic because you can't get to them physically. it's important to get search and rescuers to them tomorrow. >> kelly: that is adam housley laying it out in what the people are facing. >> jamie: and it's a scramble as they try to deal with the damaged nuclear power plants, the government is declaring a state of atomic power emergency. it's asking russia to raise energy sfleismt was the scene at one of the country's major refineries, up in flames. the prime m
numbers picked out. thanks so much. >> it's five bucks. all right. i'll do it. good luck to all of us. see you tomorrow. it's 9:00 a.m. on the east coast. 6:00 a.m. in the west. i'm carol costello sitting in for kyra phillips. we begin in libya. new day and new sounds of violence in tripoli. explosions and anti-aircraft fire echo across the capital. we'll get the latest from there. >>> witnesses say in government tanks and snipers are in the center of misurata and thofrs a hospitals are overflowing. gadhafi says he will defeat the coalition by any method. and that coalition is growing. this morning we learned that kuwait and jordan joining the list of countries against gadhafi. just minutes ago turkey joined the group. it will provide warships and a submarine to enforce an arms embargo against libya. this military action could be long and drawn out. here's what president obama said about that in an interview with cnn. >> gadhafi may try to hunker down and wait it out even in the face of a no-fly zone even though his forces have been degraded. but keep in mind that we don't just have milita
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
at three mile island gave us the assurance that we were getting fact that is we needed in order to make key decisions. i don't care how good a decision-maker you are. if you don't have the right facts it's not going to prevail. >> sir, when you would -- as you're watching this, what is the advice that you would want to impart to japanese officials that are now having to assess this disaster? >> probably the key thing is just to keep pushing and in effect cross examining every possible source in order to get a reliable set of facts you can use to make decisions. there are involved technical questions here that you require the need of experts and obviously they have flooded the area with all kinds of expertise and advice. but it's when it comes to making difficult decisions like i'm sure the decision to evacuate was you've got to be sure that you've got a firm grip on precisely what's going on. >> for a lot of people watching this, they are reminded that there are 104 nuclear power plants in america. does the situation in japan change your perspective at all about nuclear energy and its uses
on playground started watching the children the thank you for watching us, folks. >>shepard: it is 4:00 a.m. friday in tokyo, 3:00 on thursday afternoon in new york city and i'm shephard smith in japan's capital city as radiation leaks from the damaged fukushima nuclear plant to the north. president obama is set to speak to the nation on the nuclear cries in just a few minutes and we will bring you that live as it begins. crews are using water cannons and helicopters to try to keep the reactors from everheating and melting down. a biggest concern is what is happening at reactor number three, the only unit that uses fuel mixed with highly toxic combinations with a lower melting point and officials say the cooling pool there is almost empty. there also are problems with a pool for spent fuel rods at reactor four at fukushima and the u.s. nuclear chief says the water evaporated. if they are exposed they can catch fire, melt, and release large amounts of ridation into the air. we are told crews are still working on a new power line that would restore the electricity there in theory and get th
: what a world. martha: we are glad to have you with us in "america's newsroom." bill: you've got it "happening now" starts right now. jenna: breaking developments in a brand-new story this hour, developments fast and furious out of libya where the rebels putting up quite a fight as qaddhafi forces turn up the heat bringing in tanks, firing rockets and launching more attacks. out of syria, the country's entire cabinet just resigned. a major discrimination lawsuit against walmart. will the supreme court let it go forward? it's a big question, it's all new, it's all live, "happening now." we've been on a roll with big news days, haven't we, greg. gregg: we certainly have. jenna: we are so glad you are with us. gregg: i'm greg jarrett in for jon scott. there are brand-new developments to tell you about in libya where a battle for qaddhafi's hometown is raging. just some of the gunfire there, rebel forces armed with machine guns working very hard to make headway after a set back in sirte. progovernment forces beating them back using tanks, heavy mortar and rockets, but the outgunned r
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
warren christopher. there is the subject of diplomacy. the u.s. is now engaged in three wars in three different muslim countries. the issue of diplomacy has never been more critical, it seems. we are glad you are joining us, including a look back at our interview with warren christopher, right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference -- >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. kcet public television] tavis: a few programming notes. tomorrow night on the program, we will take a look at the relief and recovery operations in japan with architect hitoshi abe and a conversation with known play right eve ensler. later this week, a co-founder of
're following all the breaking news. cnn's isha sze say is joining us from cnn international. i've got to tell you, so much news. i've been a reporter for a long time, but i can't remember a time when there's been so many breaking news stories of such enormity happening, isha, at the same time. >> absolutely, wolf, no doubt about it. we are, of course, closely following the events taking place in japan that are rapidly unfolding, but as you mentioned you are there in cairo with the secretary of state hillary clinton, an important visit there. many in the arab world watching closely to see as she meets with egypt's new leaders, wolf. >> it's a critically important trip she's having. there's by no means a done deal here in egypt that everything is going to work out just fine. just a little while ago down in tahrir square, and i was there. there was gunfire and gunshots going out as some coptic christian protesters were running, hundreds of people running on the street. still tense. a lot more on this part of the story. what's happening in libya now. gadhafi is running and moving quickly supposed
? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the nuclear crisis in japan moves into its second week. and this morning, the head of the u.n.'s nuclear energy agency says japan is racing against the clock. here's the latest. engineers hope to reconnect electricity to at least two of the reactors at the fukushima daiichi power plant sometime today. but, it is unclear if any of the cooling systems will work. smoke is rising from reactor number 2, but officials don't know why. fire trucks are now being used to spray water on the plant, and attempts to use helicopters have been discontinued. japanese officials said today they are asking the u.s. government for help. charlie d'agata is in niigata, japan, with more. good morning, charlie. >> reporter: good morning to you, betty. nobody is watching the events unfolding at the nuclear power plant more closely than the people here. many who were evacuated from the region around that plant and wonder if they'll ever be able to go home. fire trucks resumed blasting water onto japan's crippl
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
of the outer slopes are very, very -- a bit misleading. >> gerard fryer with us on the line. we appreciate you giving us time and perspective. we will continue to check in with you this morning. >> we're going to take a quick break and "american morning," special edition, covering the latest on this earthquake and tsunami. we'll be right back. wrench? wrench. basic. preferred. at meineke i have options on oil changes. and now i get free roadside assistance with preferred or supreme. my money. my choice. my meineke. time to face the pollen that used to make me sneeze. but with zyrtec® liquid gels, i get fast, 24-hour allergy relief. so i feel better by the time we tee off. zyrtec® liquid gels work fast, so i can love the air®. the one time of year red lobster creates so many irresistible ways to treat yourself to lobster. like our new lobster-and-shrimp trio with a parmesan lobster bake, our decadent lobster lover's dream with both sweet maine and buttery rock lobster tails and eleven more choices, each served with a salad and unlimited cheddar bay biscuits. come celebrate lobsterfest right
. and then it needs help. >>> welc. i'm kim lawton, sitting in for bob abernathy. thank you for joining us. faith based and humanitarian aid groups gearing up to help those on friday. the earthquake was at strongest ever recorded in japan, and one of the largest in the world in the last century. the house committee on homeland security this week held a first in a series of controversial herings emining what it called radicalization in the american muslim community and there was wide religious reaction. the hearing called by chair of committee, new york republican peter king, who invokes the member of the 9/11 attacks. >> we must be fully aware home groan radicalization is apart o al qaeda's strategy to continue attacking the united states. al qaeda is actively targeting the american muslim community for recruitment. today's hearing will addresshe dangerous trend. >> reporter: first step on the witness list was congressman keith ellison a democrat from minnesota and the first muslim elected to the house of representatives. >> it's true that specific individuals, including some who are muslims, are
of the best shows on tv, after all. that's all for us for now. >>> here's my colleague anderson cooper with "ac 360." >> thank you very much, piers. it is 5:00 a.m. in libya right now. moammar gadhafi faced reporters today and spun a story of what he says is happening in libya. it was a story. he says the people love him, his son says everything is peaceful. tonight you will hear their statements and then you will hear the facts of what is happening, you will hear facts and see evidence for yourselves, you will learn the truth from our reporters on the ground and the libyan people themselves trapped in their homes in many cases, speaking out, no longer letting fear rule their lives. new video tonight, fighting taking place, about 130 miles to the east of tripoli where anti-government protesters are in control. listen to the fire. [ gunfire ] >> you can see some of the tracer fire. when aimed at human beings, it is devastating. also, 30 miles west of tripoli, this is the scene. the city contlled by anti-government protesters tonight. but gadhafi's grip on tripoli remains tight. though h
successful working with dea, tracking down money payments, money laundering schemes in use and not to get to the head of the hydrate as you well as the threat continues to expand. will we have set up as a contact group for piracy off the coast of somalia and out of that has emerged for workgroups. the u.s. leads a workgroup on working with the maritime industry of situational awareness. this is called worker three. what we look at our trends. so far this fiscal year which commenced on the first of what tober. we spent 81 piracy events. of those 37 were successful. again, what the fight by fight lane dollars payoff. if you are 3781, that would probably get you in the hall of fame if your plane based all. and these are generally viewed from a country where the daily wages maybe $2 a day. the site by $5 million sun is a lucrative business to be in. if you have a large diaspora within somalia, and a largely unemployed youth, this is literally at the opportunity of a lifetime. so what is working? we have to the international maritime organization a number of best management practices again for
explain to us today -- yesterday about nato, above and beyond the command structure issues and military operations, and did you feel today that europe is totally united as to the diplomatic and political fallout for libya? what a the next pages? >> the next page is on london -- in london. but for that summit, mr. cameron and i will probably suggest a common way forward in order to do things stage by stage. but next is the london summit on tuesday with the members of the coalition. we will talk about the next ages. >> is there going to be of franco-prussian plan? >> noaa, but the situation -- a solution cannot simply be military. it will have to be diplomatic and political, even themough goddafi's apparent ability to listen to reason made it important for us to invade militarily. >> when france internet of, it was hit with an idea of developing their defensive capabilities of your. but now all of our partners want to rush to the nato umbrella even though we have our own back garden. you feel that the defense ha principals are a long less rigid long-lost concept? >> i do not know what i h
'll get our first indication of the strength of the event on the u.s. mainland, over the next 15 minutes and that is when forecasts show the waves will reach san francisco. whether or not they'll be damaging, or even noticeable, has yet to be seen. >> japan's east coast, hit with a 23-foot tsunami, shortly after the quake struck. police along the country's northeast coast, report finding the bodies of two to three hundred people, japan railways working to find a missing passenger train. while the government reports the giant wave swept away a ship, carrying about 100 people. >> unfortunately we expect to get more reports like those, 8.9 magnitude quake is japan's worst on record as we say, one of the worst in world history. and rocked cities hundreds of miles from epicenter an spawned dozens and dozens, as we hear it of aftershocks. >> look at one of japan's three nuke we're power plants, that are having some problems right now, the worst in the city of onahana where police ordered evacuations where a fire disabled a cooling system there. no reports of radiation leaking, secretary of sta
senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people des
reportedly near or on a bus carrying u.s. soldiers at the frankfurt airport. amy kellogg is following this breaking story live from london. amy. >> reporter: yes, we're trying to piece together the information. we're getting it at this point various press agencies on the ground, pretty much now the frankfurt police and the u.s. military, who are investigating this. two people dead, we understand, one, a u.s. soldier, when allegedly a 21-year-old shooter from kosovo opened fire on a bus, carrying u.s. soldiers, at the frankfurt airport. now, this just happened, so, again, we're just piecing together this information. we believe it's one soldier killed, and the driver of the bus, and then two people taken to the hospital. you know the airport base, the medical center, which is part of the u.s. military s. based very close to frankfurt and that is the biggest u.s. military hospital outside the united states. it's where soldiers coming from iraq and afghanistan are treated. again, we don't have information about the actual soldiers on that bus, where they were going, to or from, but we kn
. a great interview. that's all for us tonight. >> i did too. >> that's all for tonight, and matthew and his bongoes. >>> good morning. anti-government protests are growing louder across the middle east today. more change could be on the way for the region. meanwhile, the international military forces are focusing right now on libya. also an apology in japan. after more workers are exposed to potentially deadly levels of radiation. and what's being blamed for this overexposure? a communications error. all this while fears grow that one reactor at that plant could be leaking. from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn start morning. hello to you all. glad you could spent some part of your saturday morning with us. i'm t.j. holmes. i do want to start now, though, in japan with the growing concern over radiation levels in the ocean water around that damaged nuclear plant. radiation levels in the air at least seem to be decreasing. paula hancock's live for us in tokyo. hello to up. what are they saying about this possible leak of one of those reaccour reactor cores. that's a key c
'm erica hill. good to have you with us this morning. we begin with that ongoing pain at the pump, which you have likely noticed. the unrest in the middle east has sent gas prices soaring over the past few weeks. a gallon of gasoline now averages which is 78 cents higher than it was just one year ago. cbs news business and economics correspondent rebecca jarvis joins us from a gas station here in manhattan with more on that price spike and how washington may respond to it. rebecca, good morning. >> good morning, erica. and this is a scene we're really seeing play out across gas stations throughout the country. prices back near $4 a gallon in some places. they even are paying $4 a gallon. back where prices were in 2008. and now the government is considering getting involved. unrest in the middle east has gasoline prices here soaring. in just two weeks prices at the pump have jumped 33 cents. that's the second biggest increase in that amount of time, ever. >> $65 for gas. pretty unbelievable. >> reporter: u.s. drivers are currently paying an average of $3.51 a gallon. with libya's oil fiel
is working frantically to prevent nuclear meltdowns. greg palkot joins us live north of tokyo from the latest on the recovery efforts. >> reporter: that japanese prime minister went on to say it's going to take the determination of people like the folks in these coastal town in northeastern japan and people throughout the region to deal with the situation. they are getting hit on all fronts. as you noted there is a nuclear catastrophe up the coast from where we are. today we saw another nuclear reactor stricken by the earthquake that hit here on friday. sea water had to be poured into the reactor to cool it down to avoid a full scale meltdown. still evacuation of the region around this nuclear reactor complex continues and the screening for radiation poisoning also continues as the death toll builds. yesterday we heard from a police official in one region in this area, he said, hey, i think there is about 10,000 people from my region. he said today, i think there is about 10,000 people dead in my region. people are surviving as we move around this area, they are finding harder and harder to s
, america. joining us is "world news" anchor, diane sawyer, is who is there in sendai, japan, where the scope of the destruction is staggering. aftershocks still rocking the region. >> dealing with two crises. humanitarian. and an urgent disaster, to avoid a nuclear emergency. there was a third partial meltdown overnight. 11 injured in the blast. and after american officials detected radiation onboard "the uss ronald reagan," it was moved offshore. and nuclear experts still believe that the chances of a full-scale meltdown are remote. but the chances of a nuclear disaster, even worse than we feared. >> the death toll may top 10,000, with reports of thousands of bodies washing ashore. the disaster has also dealt a powerful blow to japan's economy. their stock market plunged overnight, as the government announced it would pump more than $200 billion into the economy. and we have new pictures for you to see. an aftershock this morning. when you see the images, you can see the power lines shaking in the snow. and the road splitting apart down below. again, this in this morning. we have
in the city there. adam, what can you tell us about the nuclear concerns there? >> reporter: yeah, here is at the fish market, the japanese coast, 70 miles away from the first reactor you're talking about, the one that caused the problem the last couple of days before the new reactor up the close from there caused problems and people were talking about the threat at that does exist around this entire region because the fact you have three separate reactors that people are extremely worried about. that evaluation area we're told is about 15 miles in circumference. and up to 200,000 people for sure have already been evacuated and the government says maybe as many as 300,000 will be evacuated and we do know that there are at least 19 scientists on at least one site where they're going through and checking each person being brought out to see what kind of radiation con tamation they've been exposed to. >> yeah, adam, we've been seeing video of some of that radiation testing going on. where do you put more than 200,000 people who were evacuated in the middle of an earthquake zone? >> well, w
and opportunities that missile defense provides us. under secretary of state, ms. ellen tousher is under secretary of state for arms control and national security. it is my pleasure to introduce her to you this afternoon. she serves as a senior adviser to the president, secretary of state for arms control, nonprorifflation and disrmerment. she chaired the house arms services seb committee on strategic forces where she was a supporter of missile defense. ladies and gentlemen, please help me welcome under secretary of state for arms control and international security under secretary ellen tousher. [applause] >> good afternoon. it's great to be back. general pat, thank you for inviting me. he's a great patriot and his work is a great benefit. speaking from our colleagues, pat, we appreciate your advice and very, very hard work and thank you for your patriotism and making our country safer and more secure. i have spoken at this conference for several years now. when i was in politics as a member of congress from the california's 10th congressional district, i was a member aft house arms services commi
far. there is a tsunami warning in hawaii and parts of the u.s. west coast today friday, march hawaii and parts of the u.s. west coast today friday, march 11, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this friday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm ann curry in for matt. this was a powerful earthquake. the images are stunning out of japan. it shows the tsunami sweeping inland, some 60 miles over farmland in sendai japan, 200 miles north of tok yochlt cars, housings, buildings being swept out with this massive wave. >> it started with an 8.9 magnitude quake that hit around 2:45 p.m. local time. it is the largest quake in japan's recorded history and the fifth strongest quake in the world in the past 111 years. there have been at least 19 aftershocks, including several stronger than last month's devastating quake in new zealand. a tsunami warning has been extended to include hawaii and parts along the u.s. west coast. >> when it starts to hit the continental shelf it moves as fast as 500 miles per hour, the speed of a jumbo jet. the first wave is exp
of terrorism after the u.s. drops 40 missiles and tomahawk cruise missiles targets sites. >> steve: joining us from the site where that plane was shot down yesterday, rick, do we know, whose plane was that and who did shoot it down? >> reporter: we can confirm now who that plane belonged to. we believe we're the only network have located the fighter jet that shot down out of the skies of benghazi, yesterday morning. behind me is the engine of that jet, the wings, char pieces remains and the photographer was rolling on the jet that was hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into that area on the southern edge of the city and what we're hearing from locals is that they believe the pilot, who was an opposition fighter as opposed to gaddafi directed this wounded jet into this area that's unpopulated and old adoption home. and the pilot put the jet here and we know that the pilot had a family and ejected far too late and we found the harness from his ejecting seat out of the seat itself and to clear up confusion we found a tail section of the jet pointed with the old royal jet and the new flag for t
chris lawrence with a look at what role the u.s. might play in the no-fly zone. chris, live at the pentagon, what's on deck for the u.s. now that the un has passed this? >> ali, the u.s. air force has a base in italy, the navy has two, and the italians have already okayed the use of their area to launch some of the missions in this know fly zone. there was an aircraft carrier in the mediterranean sea near libya. it left earlier this week and is now out in the arabian sea. without a carrier, planes will have to fly possibly farther, which means they won't be able to spend as much time over libyan aerospace which means you may need more planes to carry out the mission. some of the officials i've spoken with here in the pentagon say don't just think of a no-fly as american fighter pilots flying american jets. there are other ways in which the u.s. can contribute. unmanned drones, for instance. the u.s. also has signal-jamming aircraft that could disrupt colonel gadhafi's ability to communicate with his forces. overall what you'll have to do is have a very clear line of command
. joining us now from jerusalem, david horowitz, ed tore of the "washington post." he will be joining us about what's happening on the ground. we're looking at pictures out of jerusalem. you can see the scene there. a lot of questions, chaotic scene as people scramble to safety to figure out what had actually occurred, what took place. this comes amid a great deal of tension in the middle east, and this is just the latest that we have seen this coming out of israel between israelis and the palestinians, a conflict, and as you know, a peace that has not been achieved in that particular area. we are still waiting for more information, but you can tell from the pictures there, folks are on the phone, trying to get information, clearing the streets, the emergency personnel trying to evacuate the scene. we understand that we have a medic who is on the phone now who is joining us. sir, can you give us your name? >> i am with the american services. >> where are you now? >> i'm on the scene. we are nearly two hours after the explosion. it occurred a few minutes after 3:00 our time next to a bus
martha stewart because martha stewart keeps it -- >> i use twitter to keep in touch. >> countries and cultures are brought together like never before. >> who do hillary clinton, martha stewart, snoop dogg, alissa milano, and i have in common, along with millions of you? >> i'm using twitter to send pictures and thoughts from space. >> tonight, find out what all the twittering's about. if you're not on it, what are you missing? if you are on it, what you may not know that you ought to know. a generation is tweeting and making history. >>> tonight, twitter queens martha stewart and alissa milano on twitter. meet two people that invented twitter. a special live tweeting edition of @pierstonight. [ applause ] ♪ >>> good evening. and welcome to a special edition of "piers morgan tonight" with our live studio audience. with me, two rather special gentlemen who five years ago had the brilliant idea for twitter. co-founders biz stone and jack dorsey. [ applause ] >> 140 million people a day tweet, and in a short while i'm going to bring in some world-class tweeters. martha stewart, ther
, starting to feel a little chilly. >> starting to complain a little bit. >> getting used to the warmer temperatures. >> not much i can do for steve. >> i'll take it. >> the rest of us, it is a little chilly out there. a few spots below freezing. bring along a jacket or coat. our highs today will be in the upper 40s and low 50s. not a lot to show you. see the greens and yellows off to the west in ken and southern independent -- in kentucky and southern indiana. that is our next weather maker. until then, we should a decent day today. right now, our temperatures are cool. they're real cool. how cool are they? let's switch maps and we'll be able to tell you. 40degrees at reagan national. dulles, below freezing, that's cold, 31. bwi marshall, 34. 52 the daytime high. winds will be light out of the north at five to 10. kind of typical for this time of year. >> i think it was about that early in the morning in miami and i was like oh, how chilly. this is what it is like back home. it is amazing what a difference it make when you go on vacation. >> how easily we're spoiled by sunshine. julie
us yesterday, it may be hard to understand why someone would jump off a cliff unless you understand they're being chased by a tiger. and that tiger is the tea party. in other words the gop is jumping off the political cliff right now and the tea party is that tiger chasing behind it. the latest example, a tea party leader calling for john boehner's defeat because he won't support the tea party's also after newt resigned after leading his party to a disaster after being reprimanded himself after being nominated on the family values republican party ticket? we'll find out. newt gingrich all but made it official today. on the subject of sex scandals, more evidence is surfacing that it could lead to an indictment for john edwards, misusing campaign funds or, in fact, using funds as -- that should have been a campaign contribution. finally, let me finish with the un-american effort on the right to convince people that president obama is somehow un-american. first of all i want to get the facts. here's radio talk show host ben fischer. let's listen. >> you seem to think there's some valid
tonight that going to church could be making us overweight. >>> and amazing grace. the unthinkable obstacles facing this bride to be. but she is determined to walk down that aisle. >>> and good evening. we begin tonight with startling numbers about a new super bug now spreading. it's one of our biggest fears when a loved one goes into the hospital. the fear they'll catch one of those infections that antibiotics can't fight. tonight, it's all hands on deck at several hospitals to stop this from spreading. yunji de nies is in los angeles. the hardest hit city so far. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, david. health officials here in los angeles were stunned to find this brand new infection spreading. it is deadly and it is now surfacing across the country. and even our most powerful medicines, like this cipro, are unable to stop it. it may be the most dangerous super bug to date, spreading through hospitals, nursing homes and short-term care facilities. officials in southern california now identify more than 350 cases. people becoming gravely ill from this new infection known a
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